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values of $(1 + 1/n)^n$ for $0 < n < 26$

Major Section: 
Reference
Type of Math Object: 
Data Structure

Mathematics Subject Classification

33B99 no label found

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/me wonders how long will take before someone questions it.

Like on http://planetmath.org/encyclopedia/TableOfValuesForSinx.html
f
G -----> H G
p \ /_ ----- ~ f(G)
\ / f ker f
G/ker f

Drini said: me wonders how long will take before someone questions it.

I think you are already questioning the usefulness... and for a good reason. Perhaps, I can see some remote pedagogical value on showing the decimal expansion of consecutive values of (1+1/n)^n, just so one can understand the rate of convergence towards e ... but what is the point of showing the numerator and denominator???

The numerator is clearly (n+1)^n and the denominator is n^n, do we really need tables for those?

T

It's of no use for show-offs, that's for sure. But it is useful for people, like me, who go for a sanity-check every once in a while. Like, I had a calculator once that had the fourth digit cell from the right its bottom left segment blown out. If I hadn't thought to try inputting a bunch of 8s, I might have used it for something important and paid $1,000 too much for something (or $100.0, but still...

Before I start rambling, let me just say I find this entry very useful. It's one thing to know that such and such formula approximates a certain constant, but it feels more real if you have some awareness of what kind of values give better approximations, or what kind of formulas. Your table of sine values is useful for checking your calculator's working as you expect (you might not have any segments blown out, but you might've forgotten you've got it set to gradians or something).

I was questioning the usefulness of usefulness questioning.
f
G -----> H G
p \ /_ ----- ~ f(G)
\ / f ker f
G/ker f

> I was questioning the usefulness of usefulness questioning.

How useless!

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