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words for numbers in Slavic languages

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Anton Mravcek and XJamRastafire has read-write access for this entry. Anyone else knowing or having studied Slavic languages in greater detail than I have (I know little beyond what is stated here) let me know so I can also give you rw access.

pahio says that in Russian, "The stress in 4 and 11 is on the second syllable, in 8 and 40 on the first syllable." I did not address this in my handling of the correction because I don't know if you took the transliterations straight from the book or if you made them yourself from the Cyrillic. If the latter, then please add acute accents on the vowel of the syllables pahio indicates. If the former, I suppose you can just say "that's what the book says."

The origin of the Russian '40', "sorok" (with stress on 1st syllable) is quite interesting. The word has originally meant a bundle of hides (leather) of squirrel of some other fur animal, used by the fur-hunters of the northern forests.

We Finns also have an old piece unit "kiihtelys", used for '40 hides'. As well, it's worth to mention that the present Finnish word for 'money' is "raha", meaning originally a 'hide of squirrel'!

Jussi

The origin of the Russian '40', "sorok" (with stress on 1st syllable) is quite interesting. The word has originally meant a bundle of hides (leather) of squirrel _or_ some other fur animal, used by the fur-hunters of the northern forests.

We Finns also have an old piece unit "kiihtelys", used for '40 hides'. As well, it's worth to mention that the present Finnish word for 'money' is "raha", meaning originally a 'hide of squirrel'!

Jussi
(I corrected a typo.)

> I did not address this in my handling of the correction because I don't know if you took the transliterations straight from the book or if you made them yourself from the Cyrillic.

I made them by hand (and not by trying to type them in Russian and then applying mass replace). This probably explains the inconsistency of my mistakes.

P.S. I looked up "second" (the unit of time) in the English Wikipedia and then clicked over to the Russian Wikipedia. The title of that Wikipedia entry I would transliterate as "cekunda."

That is very interesting. My guess was that it had to do something with religion (such as the observance of Lent); I wouldn't have guessed anything mundane. Thanks for enlightening us on this!

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